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This brief describes the goals and processes for each working group as well as recommended skill levels and learning outcomes for Michigan’s entry-level, college-level mathematics courses: Quantitative Reasoning, Statistics and Preparation for Calculus.
Level:
State, Classroom
Process Stage:
Implementing
Role:
Math Department
DOWNLOADABLE FILE(S)
The Dana Center recommends that implementation of mathematics pathways is most effective when efforts are coordinated across institutions while still allowing for local decision making on how the pathways are operationalized. Monitoring depth of implementation of reforms under these conditions is a daunting task, especially when there is not a statewide policy mandate or significant funding for institutions. Collecting information about implementation practices is a further complexity.

The Texas Success Center (TSC) has addressed these challenges related to implementation by highlighting exemplary practices among colleges and motivating continuous improvement. TSC supports Texas community colleges in a variety of ways including evaluating, supporting, and scaling ongoing efforts to improve student success rates.
Level:
Institution
Process Stage:
Implementing, Continuously Improving
Role:
Institutional Leadership, Math Department, Partner Disciplines, Advisors and Coordinators
DOWNLOADABLE FILE(S)
[UPDATED 2019] Mathematics pathways are designed to address three barriers to student learning and success: inappropriate placement, misaligned content and long course sequences. This brief summarizes the research on these barriers and presents evidence that well-designed mathematics pathways lead to increased student success.
Level:
State, Institution
Process Stage:
Getting Started
Role:
Policy, Institutional Leadership, Math Department, Advisors and Coordinators
DOWNLOADABLE FILE(S)
When the focus for entry-level mathematics shifted, over a decade ago, from access to success, it catalyzed demand for accelerated multiple mathematics pathways alongside the algebraic-intensive pathway. Subsequent successes have been exciting, showing more than three times the success rates for students in one third of the time for some programs. With these startling increases came a widespread concern about maintaining rigor within the discipline.

In response to this concern, the Charles A. Dana Center engaged in a study of the meaning and intention of rigor in mathematics education. This paper first explores the meaning of rigor in mathematics education through a synthesis of interviews with leading mathematicians and educators, and presents a review of the literature in higher education and K–12. It concludes by offering recommendations for a shared definition of rigor and its implications for curriculum and instruction.
Level:
Classroom
Role:
Policy, Math Department, Partner Disciplines, Advisors and Coordinators, Researchers
While mathematics pathways are not new, there is still a long way to go towards wide-scale adoption and normative practice. The premise of this monograph is that there is expertise to be shared and issues still to be addressed. The monograph comprises chapters organized along topics that are aligned with the DCMP theory of change. The DCMP believes that systemic and sustainable change is best achieved through a process that is faculty-driven, administrator-supported, policy-enabled, and culturally reinforced. We hope that each chapter will provide the guidance and inspiration for improving student success in mathematics education through the widespread adoption, implementation, and continuous improvement of mathematics pathways.
Level:
State, Institution, Classroom
Process Stage:
Getting Started, Planning, Implementing
Role:
Policy, Institutional Leadership, Math Department, Partner Disciplines, Advisors and Coordinators, Researchers
The Central Valley Higher Education Consortium (CVHEC), in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center of the University of Texas, Austin (Dana Center), has launched an initiative to improve students’ success and completion rates in mathematics at colleges and universities in California’s Central Valley.
This report looks at the achievement of the ACT®-tested 2017 graduating class relative to college and career readiness. A total of 60% of students in the 2017 US graduating class took the ACT® test, compared to 64% last year, 54% in 2013, and 42% in 2007.
The purpose of this site is to display key performance indicators of New Mexico’s 24 higher education
institutions: Research universities, regional universities, branch colleges and independent community
colleges.
Helping Washington students achieve success in college math.

The Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education have identified college completion as their No. 1 goal and are working to increase the number of degrees and certificates earned in Oklahoma by an average of 1,700 per year, resulting in a 67 percent increase by 2023.