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Students who are struggling in mathematics can often find academic support in the form of one-on-one tutoring and drop-in help labs, which are commonplace at both two-year and four-year institutions. These supports provide personalized interventions and often play a key role in helping students succeed in gateway mathematics courses. Identifying effective practices in these types of student services, however, is a challenge that many institutions face. Oklahoma State University sought to address this challenge, which led to a revitalized mathematics support center that not only helps students through use of data-proven practices, but also serves as a center for ongoing research to improve its student support practices
Level:
Institution
Process Stage:
Implementing, Continuously Improving
Role:
Institutional Leadership, Math Department, Advisors and Coordinators
DOWNLOADABLE FILE(S)
If an institution has multiple mathematics pathways in place and the ultimate goal of reform is to better meet the needs
 of students, then an essential element in the implementation process is guiding students into the path that is best suited
 to their educational goals. But what is the best way to communicate to freshmen—many of whom might already be feeling overwhelmed—what their course choices are and what the consequences of those choices might be? One college found success in an elegant, innovative solution. 


This summary is part of the Charles A. Dana Center’s “Notes from the Field” series, which highlights examples of innovative practices from colleges, universities, and systems.

Level:
Institution
Process Stage:
Implementing, Continuously Improving
Role:
Math Department, Advisors and Coordinators
DOWNLOADABLE FILE(S)
All systemic change depends upon the hard work and commitment of the people who are on the front lines. Engaging these stakeholders in a positive and effective process is a key leadership challenge. In the case
 of implementing mathematics pathways, many leaders are concerned about how to support mathematics faculty in the change effort. Metropolitan Community College–Kansas City took a strategic approach to supporting and engaging faculty in mathematics pathways. 
This summary is part of the Charles A. Dana Center’s “Notes from the Field” series, which highlights examples of innovative practices from colleges, universities, and systems.
Level:
Institution
Process Stage:
Implementing, Continuously Improving
Role:
Institutional Leadership, Math Department, Partner Disciplines
DOWNLOADABLE FILE(S)
The Dana Center recommends that implementation of mathematics pathways is most effective when efforts are coordinated across institutions while still allowing for local decision making on how the pathways are operationalized. Monitoring depth of implementation of reforms under these conditions is a daunting task, especially when there is not a statewide policy mandate or significant funding for institutions. Collecting information about implementation practices is a further complexity.

The Texas Success Center (TSC) has addressed these challenges related to implementation by highlighting exemplary practices among colleges and motivating continuous improvement. TSC supports Texas community colleges in a variety of ways including evaluating, supporting, and scaling ongoing efforts to improve student success rates.
Level:
Institution
Process Stage:
Implementing, Continuously Improving
Role:
Institutional Leadership, Math Department, Partner Disciplines, Advisors and Coordinators
Many institutions implementing and scaling mathematics pathways are faced with the challenge of enrolling students in relevant gateway math courses that are aligned to their programs of study. When faculty and policy agencies in Arkansas understood the impact of transfer and applicability of mathematics courses on students, they committed to state-level action and coordination to address the problem. In an effort to increase student success in mathematics and increase overall degree completion at a large scale, various Arkansas stakeholders set into motion strategic policy action to provide statewide guidance and alignment of non-STEM mathematics courses to programs of study.
Level:
State
Process Stage:
Implementing
Role:
Policy, Institutional Leadership, Math Department, Advisors and Coordinators
Across the nation, institutions are implementing one–semester co–requisite models, which refer to the practice of placing students directly into college–level courses regardless of preparation, and providing them with supports for just–in–time instruction. One four–year institution — University of Central Arkansas — implemented and scaled corequisite models for its Quantitative Literacy and College Algebra courses that led to significant student success and completion rates nearing 90% for underprepared students.
Level:
Institution, Classroom
Process Stage:
Planning, Implementing
Role:
Institutional Leadership, Math Department, Partner Disciplines
Across the nation, institutions are implementing one–semester co–requisite models, which refer to the practice of placing students directly into college–level courses regardless of preparation, and providing them with supports for just-in-time instruction. A two–year institution in Oklahoma — Tulsa Community College — combined its institutional initiatives in order to quickly and effectively implement and scale co–requisite supports across its campuses to support underprepared students in completing their first college–level coursework.
Level:
Institution, Classroom
Process Stage:
Planning, Implementing
Role:
Math Department
Most state– and system–level policies and practices support the transferability of credits, but do not account for the applicability of those credits to a student’s program of study. Even when students are able to transfer credits, those credits might not count toward their desired majors, which can lead to wasted time, increased costs for both students and the state, and students dropping out of college altogether. Efforts to remedy these problems are most effective when enabled by a well-considered policy environment which, in turn, is informed by data.

In Washington, substantive steps have been taken to address this issue with a data-driven process.
Level:
State
Process Stage:
Continuously Improving
Role:
Policy, Institutional Leadership, Partner Disciplines, Advisors and Coordinators, Researchers